Alexander Hamilton - (1755 - 1804)

Alexander Hamilton Signature
  1. Biography
  2. Picture
  3. Quotes
  4. Works
  5. Discussion

Picture of Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton
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Alexander Hamilton Tivia

Alexander Hamilton currently has his portrait on the $10 US bill
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Alexander Hamilton Biography



The name of Hamilton, the pure patriot, the brave soldier, the accomplished statesman, and acute financier, there is a halo which brightens With the lapse of years, for he was peerless among his fellows. He was a native of the island of Nevis, in the "West Indies, and was descended from a Scotch father and a French mother. He was born on the 11th of January, 1151. He received a fair education in childhood, and at the age of twelve years he became a clerk in the mercantile house of Nicholas Cruger, at St. Croix. Every leisure moment he devoted to study; and while yet a mere youth, a production of his pen give such evidence of great genius, that the friends of his widowed mother providsd ra3ans for sending him to New York to be thoroughly educated. At the age of sixteen years he accompanied his mother to the United States, and entered King's (now Columbia) College as a student, where he remained about three years. The contest of words, with Great Britaiil, was then raging, and gave sops to his thoughts and topics for his pen. "When only seventeen years of age he appeared as a speaker at public meetings, and he assisted the Sons of Liberty in carrying off British cannon from the battery of Fort George, at the foot of Broidwav, in 1775. He entered the army as captain of an artillery company, raised chiefly by himself; and performed good service at "White Plains, Trenton, and Princeton. His pen was as active as his sword, and many articles, attributed to more mature and eminent men, were the ofispring of his brain.

SOURCE: Eminent Americans - By Benson J. Lossing (Published 1886)

More Information about Alexander Hamilton

Religion: Episcopalian
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Documents from our document library


Biography for Alexander Hamilton (1755 - 1804)
Biography for Alexander Hamilton
(File Size: 1.92K)

Anti-Federalist Papers 1787 - 1788
Anti-Federalist Papers is the collective name given to the scattered writings of those Americans who during the late 1780s to early 1790s opposed to or who raised doubts about the merits of a firmer and more energetic union as embodied in the 1787 United
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The Federalist Papers 1787 - 1788
The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay promoting the ratification of the United States Constitution. Seventy-seven were published serially in The Independent Journal and The
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Article/Blog Entries


Thomas Jefferson - Author of the Declaration of Independence

When we think of Thomas Jefferson we remember him as one of Founding Fathers and the Declaration of Independence. In addition to the weight of the responsibility in being the principal author of such a great document, he also went on to do so much more for us all. His leadership in Presidency, Ambassador to France and other political avenues paved the way for our nation to succeed. If you're interested to learn about his life, obstacles and accomplishments read on.

Democracy or Republic?

Despite clear historical evidence showing that the United States was established as a republic and not a democracy, there is still confusion regarding the difference between these two very different systems of government.  Some confusion stems because the word “democracy” is used to describe both a "type" and a "form" of government.

Equal Protection, the US Consitition, and the George Washington Connection

Whenever laws aren't explicitly stipulated in the American Constitution (and when it comes to constitutional law, nothing is explicit), each state takes advantage of the wiggle room to create and maintain its own legal code. Although this gives states a lot of leeway in areas, precautions are taken to ensure that the laws most directly affecting people have a certain level of standardization. Enter the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.<



From The Digital Public Library of America

There are currenlty are 1733 items in the DLPA for Alexander Hamilton, only 25 are displayed here.

  1. Date: 1895
    Type: text
    Harvard University
  2. Date: c. 1796
    Type: image
    National Portrait Gallery
  3. Date: 1794-1794
    Type: image
    National Portrait Gallery
  4. Date: 1804-1804
    Type: image
    National Portrait Gallery
  5. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  6. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  7. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  8. Date: 1850-1850
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  9. Date: [c1898]
    Type: text
    Series title also at head of t.-p.
    Harvard University
  10. Date: 1890
    Type: text
    List of authorities": p. [261]-267.
    University of Michigan
  11. Date: 1920
    Type: text
    University of Virginia
  12. Date: [1917?]
    Type: text
    First published 1882.
    University of Illinois
  13. Date: 1896
    Type: text
    Library of Congress
  14. Date: [1910]
    Type: text
    University of California
  15. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  16. Date: 1783 - 1888
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  17. Date: ca. 1775-ca. 1890
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  18. Date: 1872-1872
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  19. Date: 1872-1872
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  20. Date: 1880-1880
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  21. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  22. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  23. Date: 1872-1872
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  24. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  25. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
See all the items for "Alexander Hamilton" at the Digital Public Library of America

Quotes by Alexander Hamilton

Quote 128 details Share on Google+ - Quote 128 Linked In Share Button - Quote 128 Energy in the executive is a leading character in the definition of good government. It is essential to the protection of the community against foreign attacks; it is not less essential to the steady administration of the laws; to the protection of property against those irregular and high-handed combinations which sometimes interrupt the ordinary course of justice; to the security of liberty against the enterprises and assaults of ambition, of faction, and of anarchy.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 69, March 14, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 217 details Share on Google+ - Quote 217 Linked In Share Button - Quote 217 There is something so far-fetched and so extravagant in the idea of danger to liberty from the militia that one is at a loss whether to treat it with gravity or with raillery; whether to consider it as a mere trial of skill, like the paradoxes of rhetoricians; as a disingenuous artifice to instill prejudices at any price; or as the serious.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 29, January 10, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 127 details Share on Google+ - Quote 127 Linked In Share Button - Quote 127 Constitutions of civil government are not to be framed upon a calculation of existing exigencies, but upon a combination of these with the probable exigencies of ages, according to the natural and tried course of human affairs. Nothing, therefore, can be more fallacious than to infer the extent of any power, proper to be lodged in the national government, from an estimate of its immediate necessities.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 34, January 4, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 134 details Share on Google+ - Quote 134 Linked In Share Button - Quote 134 I am persuaded that a firm union is as necessary to perpetuate our liberties as it is to make us respectable; and experience will probably prove that the National Government will be as natural a guardian of our freedom as the State Legislatures.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Quote 153 details Share on Google+ - Quote 153 Linked In Share Button - Quote 153 Industry is increased, commodities are multiplied, agriculture and manufacturers flourish: and herein consists the true wealth and prosperity of a state.

Alexander Hamilton: Report on a National Bank, December 13, 1790

Quote 163 details Share on Google+ - Quote 163 Linked In Share Button - Quote 163 Law is defined to be a rule of action; but how can that be a rule, which is little known, and less fixed?

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 62, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 226 details Share on Google+ - Quote 226 Linked In Share Button - Quote 226 When occasions present themselves, in which the interests of the people are at variance with their inclinations, it is the duty of the persons whom they have appointed to be the guardians of those interests, to withstand the temporary delusion, in order to give them time and opportunity for more cool and sedate reflection.

Quote 121 details Share on Google+ - Quote 121 Linked In Share Button - Quote 121 A government ought to contain in itself every power requisite to the full accomplishment of the objects committed to its care, and to the complete execution of the trusts for which it is responsible, free from every other control but a regard to the public good and to the sense of the people.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 31, January 1, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 132 details Share on Google+ - Quote 132 Linked In Share Button - Quote 132 Government implies the power of making laws. It is essential to the idea of a law, that it be attended with a sanction; or, in other words, a penalty or punishment for disobedience.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 15, 1787
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 147 details Share on Google+ - Quote 147 Linked In Share Button - Quote 147 If mankind were to resolve to agree in no institution of government, until every part of it had been adjusted to the most exact standard of perfection, society would soon become a general scene of anarchy, and the world a desert.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 65, March 7, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 157 details Share on Google+ - Quote 157 Linked In Share Button - Quote 157 It is evident from the state of the country, from the habits of the people, from the experience we have had on the point itself, that it is impracticable to raise any very considerable sums by direct taxation.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 12, November 27, 1787
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 195 details Share on Google+ - Quote 195 Linked In Share Button - Quote 195 The ingredients which constitute energy in the Executive are, first, unity; secondly, duration; thirdly, an adequate provision for its support; fourthly, competent powers. ... The ingredients which constitute safety in the republican sense are, first, a due dependence on the people, secondly, a due responsibility.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 70, March 14, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 219 details Share on Google+ - Quote 219 Linked In Share Button - Quote 219 This process of election affords a moral certainty that the office of President will seldom fall to the lot of any many who is not in an eminent degree endowed with the requisite qualifications.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 68, March 14, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 125 details Share on Google+ - Quote 125 Linked In Share Button - Quote 125 As to Taxes, they are evidently inseparable from Government. It is impossible without them to pay the debts of the nation, to protect it from foreign danger, or to secure individuals from lawless violence and rapine.

Alexander Hamilton: Address to the Electors of the State of New York, March, 1801

Quote 131 details Share on Google+ - Quote 131 Linked In Share Button - Quote 131 Good constitutions are formed upon a comparison of the liberty of the individual with the strength of government: If the tone of either be too high, the other will be weakened too much. It is the happiest possible mode of conciliating these objects, to institute one branch peculiarly endowed with sensibility, another with knowledge and firmness. Through the opposition and mutual control of these bodies, the government will reach, in its regular operations, the perfect balance between liberty and power.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 25, 1788


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