Alexander Hamilton - (1755 - 1804)

Alexander Hamilton Signature
  1. Biography
  2. Picture
  3. Quotes
  4. Works
  5. Discussion

Picture of Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton
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Alexander Hamilton Tivia

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Alexander Hamilton Biography




The name of Hamilton, the pure patriot, the brave soldier, the accomplished statesman, and acute financier, there is a halo which brightens With the lapse of years, for he was peerless among his fellows. He was a native of the island of Nevis, in the "West Indies, and was descended from a Scotch father and a French mother. He was born on the 11th of January, 1151. He received a fair education in childhood, and at the age of twelve years he became a clerk in the mercantile house of Nicholas Cruger, at St. Croix. Every leisure moment he devoted to study; and while yet a mere youth, a production of his pen give such evidence of great genius, that the friends of his widowed mother providsd ra3ans for sending him to New York to be thoroughly educated. At the age of sixteen years he accompanied his mother to the United States, and entered King's (now Columbia) College as a student, where he remained about three years. The contest of words, with Great Britaiil, was then raging, and gave sops to his thoughts and topics for his pen. "When only seventeen years of age he appeared as a speaker at public meetings, and he assisted the Sons of Liberty in carrying off British cannon from the battery of Fort George, at the foot of Broidwav, in 1775. He entered the army as captain of an artillery company, raised chiefly by himself; and performed good service at "White Plains, Trenton, and Princeton. His pen was as active as his sword, and many articles, attributed to more mature and eminent men, were the ofispring of his brain.

SOURCE: Eminent Americans - By Benson J. Lossing (Published 1886)

More Information about Alexander Hamilton

Religion: Episcopalian
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Documents from our document library


Biography for Alexander Hamilton (1755 - 1804)
Biography for Alexander Hamilton
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Anti-Federalist Papers 1787 - 1788
Anti-Federalist Papers is the collective name given to the scattered writings of those Americans who during the late 1780s to early 1790s opposed to or who raised doubts about the merits of a firmer and more energetic union as embodied in the 1787 United
(File Size: 801.78K)

The Federalist Papers 1787 - 1788
The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay promoting the ratification of the United States Constitution. Seventy-seven were published serially in The Independent Journal and The
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Article/Blog Entries


Thomas Jefferson - Author of the Declaration of Independence

When we think of Thomas Jefferson we remember him as one of Founding Fathers and the Declaration of Independence. In addition to the weight of the responsibility in being the principal author of such a great document, he also went on to do so much more for us all. His leadership in Presidency, Ambassador to France and other political avenues paved the way for our nation to succeed. If you're interested to learn about his life, obstacles and accomplishments read on.

Democracy or Republic?

Despite clear historical evidence showing that the United States was established as a republic and not a democracy, there is still confusion regarding the difference between these two very different systems of government.  Some confusion stems because the word “democracy” is used to describe both a "type" and a "form" of government.



From The Digital Public Library of America

There are currenlty are 1733 items in the DLPA for Alexander Hamilton, only 25 are displayed here.

  1. Date: 1895
    Type: text
    Harvard University
  2. Date: c. 1796
    Type: image
    National Portrait Gallery
  3. Date: 1794-1794
    Type: image
    National Portrait Gallery
  4. Date: 1804-1804
    Type: image
    National Portrait Gallery
  5. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  6. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  7. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  8. Date: 1850-1850
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  9. Date: [c1898]
    Type: text
    Series title also at head of t.-p.
    Harvard University
  10. Date: 1890
    Type: text
    List of authorities": p. [261]-267.
    University of Michigan
  11. Date: 1920
    Type: text
    University of Virginia
  12. Date: [1917?]
    Type: text
    First published 1882.
    University of Illinois
  13. Date: 1896
    Type: text
    Library of Congress
  14. Date: [1910]
    Type: text
    University of California
  15. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  16. Date: 1783 - 1888
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  17. Date: ca. 1775-ca. 1890
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  18. Date: 1872-1872
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  19. Date: 1872-1872
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  20. Date: 1880-1880
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  21. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  22. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  23. Date: 1872-1872
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  24. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  25. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
See all the items for "Alexander Hamilton" at the Digital Public Library of America

Quotes by Alexander Hamilton

Quote 202 details Share on Google+ - Quote 202 Linked In Share Button - Quote 202 The propriety of a law, in a constitutional light, must always be determined by the nature of the powers upon which it is founded.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 33, January 3, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 146 details Share on Google+ - Quote 146 Linked In Share Button - Quote 146 If it be asked, What is the most sacred duty and the greatest source of our security in a Republic? The answer would be, An inviolable respect for the Constitution and Laws — the first growing out of the last.... A sacred respect for the constitutional law is the vital principle, the sustaining energy of a free government.

Alexander Hamilton: Essay in the American Daily Advertiser, Aug 28, 1794

Quote 238 details Share on Google+ - Quote 238 Linked In Share Button - Quote 238 There is not a syllable in the plan under consideration which directly empowers the national courts to construe the laws according to the spirit of the Constitution.


Quote 136 details Share on Google+ - Quote 136 Linked In Share Button - Quote 136 I never expect to see a perfect work from imperfect man.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 85, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 180 details Share on Google+ - Quote 180 Linked In Share Button - Quote 180 No government, any more than an individual, will long be respected without being truly respectable; nor be truly respectable, without possessing a certain portion of order and stability.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 62, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 135 details Share on Google+ - Quote 135 Linked In Share Button - Quote 135 I go further, and affirm that bills of rights, in the sense and to the extent in which they are contended for, are not only unnecessary in the proposed Constitution, but would even be dangerous. They would contain various exceptions to powers not granted; and on this very account, would afford a colorable pretext to claim more than were granted. For why declare that things shall not be done which there is no power to do?

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 84, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 150 details Share on Google+ - Quote 150 Linked In Share Button - Quote 150 In disquisitions of every kind there are certain primary truths, or first principles, upon which all subsequent reasoning must depend.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 31, January 1, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 157 details Share on Google+ - Quote 157 Linked In Share Button - Quote 157 It is evident from the state of the country, from the habits of the people, from the experience we have had on the point itself, that it is impracticable to raise any very considerable sums by direct taxation.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 12, November 27, 1787
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 178 details Share on Google+ - Quote 178 Linked In Share Button - Quote 178 Let us recollect that peace or war will not always be left to our option; that however moderate or unambitious we may be, we cannot count upon the moderation, or hope to extinguish the ambition of others.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 34, January 4, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 190 details Share on Google+ - Quote 190 Linked In Share Button - Quote 190 The fundamental source of all your errors, sophisms and false reasonings is a total ignorance of the natural rights of mankind. Were you once to become acquainted with these, you could never entertain a thought, that all men are not, by nature, entitled to a parity of privileges. You would be convinced, that natural liberty is a gift of the beneficent Creator to the whole human race, and that civil liberty is founded in that; and cannot be wrested from any people, without the most manifest violation of justice.

Alexander Hamilton: The Farmer Refuted, February 23, 1775

Quote 186 details Share on Google+ - Quote 186 Linked In Share Button - Quote 186 The aim of every political constitution is, or ought to be, first to obtain for rulers men who possess most wisdom to discern, and most virtue to pursue, the common good of the society; and in the next place, to take the most effectual precautions for keeping them virtuous whilst they continue to hold their public trust.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 57, February 19, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 205 details Share on Google+ - Quote 205 Linked In Share Button - Quote 205 The republican principle demands that the deliberate sense of the community should govern the conduct of those to whom they entrust the management of their affairs; but it does not require an unqualified complaisance to every sudden breeze of passion or to every transient impulse which the people may receive from the arts of men, who flatter their prejudices to betray their interests.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 71, March 18, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 236 details Share on Google+ - Quote 236 Linked In Share Button - Quote 236 The present Constitution is the standard to which we are to cling. Under its banners, bona fide must we combat our political foes — rejecting all changes but through the channel itself provides for amendments.

Alexander Hamilton: letter to James Bayard, April, 1802

Quote 145 details Share on Google+ - Quote 145 Linked In Share Button - Quote 145 If duties are too high, they lessen the consumption; the collection is eluded; and the product to the treasury is not so great as when they are confined within proper and moderate bounds. This forms a complete barrier against any material oppression of the citizens by taxes of this class, and is itself a natural limitation of the power of imposing them.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 21, 1787
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 192 details Share on Google+ - Quote 192 Linked In Share Button - Quote 192 The great leading objects of the federal government, in which revenue is concerned, are to maintain domestic peace, and provide for the common defense. In these are comprehended the regulation of commerce that is, the whole system of foreign intercourse; the support of armies and navies, and of the civil administration.

Alexander Hamilton: Remarks in the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788


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