Alexander Hamilton - (1755 - 1804)

Alexander Hamilton Signature
  1. Biography
  2. Picture
  3. Quotes
  4. Works
  5. Discussion

Picture of Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton
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Alexander Hamilton Tivia

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Alexander Hamilton Biography



The name of Hamilton, the pure patriot, the brave soldier, the accomplished statesman, and acute financier, there is a halo which brightens With the lapse of years, for he was peerless among his fellows. He was a native of the island of Nevis, in the "West Indies, and was descended from a Scotch father and a French mother. He was born on the 11th of January, 1151. He received a fair education in childhood, and at the age of twelve years he became a clerk in the mercantile house of Nicholas Cruger, at St. Croix. Every leisure moment he devoted to study; and while yet a mere youth, a production of his pen give such evidence of great genius, that the friends of his widowed mother providsd ra3ans for sending him to New York to be thoroughly educated. At the age of sixteen years he accompanied his mother to the United States, and entered King's (now Columbia) College as a student, where he remained about three years. The contest of words, with Great Britaiil, was then raging, and gave sops to his thoughts and topics for his pen. "When only seventeen years of age he appeared as a speaker at public meetings, and he assisted the Sons of Liberty in carrying off British cannon from the battery of Fort George, at the foot of Broidwav, in 1775. He entered the army as captain of an artillery company, raised chiefly by himself; and performed good service at "White Plains, Trenton, and Princeton. His pen was as active as his sword, and many articles, attributed to more mature and eminent men, were the ofispring of his brain.

SOURCE: Eminent Americans - By Benson J. Lossing (Published 1886)

More Information about Alexander Hamilton

Religion: Episcopalian
Alexander Hamilton on Wikipedia | Amazon | Google

Documents from our document library


Biography for Alexander Hamilton (1755 - 1804)
Biography for Alexander Hamilton
(File Size: 1.92K)

Anti-Federalist Papers 1787 - 1788
Anti-Federalist Papers is the collective name given to the scattered writings of those Americans who during the late 1780s to early 1790s opposed to or who raised doubts about the merits of a firmer and more energetic union as embodied in the 1787 United
(File Size: 801.78K)

The Federalist Papers 1787 - 1788
The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay promoting the ratification of the United States Constitution. Seventy-seven were published serially in The Independent Journal and The
(File Size: 1.10M)


Article/Blog Entries


Thomas Jefferson - Author of the Declaration of Independence

When we think of Thomas Jefferson we remember him as one of Founding Fathers and the Declaration of Independence. In addition to the weight of the responsibility in being the principal author of such a great document, he also went on to do so much more for us all. His leadership in Presidency, Ambassador to France and other political avenues paved the way for our nation to succeed. If you're interested to learn about his life, obstacles and accomplishments read on.

Democracy or Republic?

Despite clear historical evidence showing that the United States was established as a republic and not a democracy, there is still confusion regarding the difference between these two very different systems of government.  Some confusion stems because the word “democracy” is used to describe both a "type" and a "form" of government.



From The Digital Public Library of America

There are currenlty are 1733 items in the DLPA for Alexander Hamilton, only 25 are displayed here.

  1. Date: 1895
    Type: text
    Harvard University
  2. Date: c. 1796
    Type: image
    National Portrait Gallery
  3. Date: 1794-1794
    Type: image
    National Portrait Gallery
  4. Date: 1804-1804
    Type: image
    National Portrait Gallery
  5. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  6. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  7. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  8. Date: 1850-1850
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  9. Date: [c1898]
    Type: text
    Series title also at head of t.-p.
    Harvard University
  10. Date: 1890
    Type: text
    List of authorities": p. [261]-267.
    University of Michigan
  11. Date: 1920
    Type: text
    University of Virginia
  12. Date: [1917?]
    Type: text
    First published 1882.
    University of Illinois
  13. Date: 1896
    Type: text
    Library of Congress
  14. Date: [1910]
    Type: text
    University of California
  15. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  16. Date: 1783 - 1888
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  17. Date: ca. 1775-ca. 1890
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  18. Date: 1872-1872
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  19. Date: 1872-1872
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  20. Date: 1880-1880
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  21. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  22. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  23. Date: 1872-1872
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  24. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  25. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
See all the items for "Alexander Hamilton" at the Digital Public Library of America

Quotes by Alexander Hamilton

Quote 217 details Share on Google+ - Quote 217 Linked In Share Button - Quote 217 There is something so far-fetched and so extravagant in the idea of danger to liberty from the militia that one is at a loss whether to treat it with gravity or with raillery; whether to consider it as a mere trial of skill, like the paradoxes of rhetoricians; as a disingenuous artifice to instill prejudices at any price; or as the serious.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 29, January 10, 1788
The Federalist Papers

Quote 230 details Share on Google+ - Quote 230 Linked In Share Button - Quote 230 Whoever attentively considers the different departments of power must perceive, that, in a government in which they are separated from each other, the judiciary, from the nature of its functions, will always be the least dangerous to the political rights of the Constitution; because it will be least in a capacity to annoy or injure them.


Quote 120 details Share on Google+ - Quote 120 Linked In Share Button - Quote 120 A fondness for power is implanted, in most men, and it is natural to abuse it, when acquired.

Alexander Hamilton: The Farmer Refuted, February 23, 1775

Quote 126 details Share on Google+ - Quote 126 Linked In Share Button - Quote 126 But as the plan of the convention aims only at a partial union or consolidation, the State governments would clearly retain all the rights of sovereignty which they before had, and which were not, by that act, EXCLUSIVELY delegated to the United States.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 32, January 3, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 132 details Share on Google+ - Quote 132 Linked In Share Button - Quote 132 Government implies the power of making laws. It is essential to the idea of a law, that it be attended with a sanction; or, in other words, a penalty or punishment for disobedience.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 15, 1787
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 135 details Share on Google+ - Quote 135 Linked In Share Button - Quote 135 I go further, and affirm that bills of rights, in the sense and to the extent in which they are contended for, are not only unnecessary in the proposed Constitution, but would even be dangerous. They would contain various exceptions to powers not granted; and on this very account, would afford a colorable pretext to claim more than were granted. For why declare that things shall not be done which there is no power to do?

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 84, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 155 details Share on Google+ - Quote 155 Linked In Share Button - Quote 155 It is a singular advantage of taxes on articles of consumption that they contain in their own nature a security against excess. They prescribe their own limit, which cannot be exceeded without defeating the end purposed — that is, an extension of the revenue.

Quote 161 details Share on Google+ - Quote 161 Linked In Share Button - Quote 161 It will be of little avail to the people, that the laws are made by men of their own choice, if the laws be so voluminous that they cannot be read, or so incoherent that they cannot be understood; if they be repealed or revised before they are promulgated, or undergo such incessant changes that no man, who knows what the law is to-day, can guess what it will be to-morrow.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 62, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 163 details Share on Google+ - Quote 163 Linked In Share Button - Quote 163 Law is defined to be a rule of action; but how can that be a rule, which is little known, and less fixed?

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 62, 1788
The Federalist Papers
Quoted Document: The Federalist Papers

Quote 188 details Share on Google+ - Quote 188 Linked In Share Button - Quote 188 The citizens of America have too much discernment to be argued into anarchy. and I am much mistaken if experience has not wrought a deep and solemn conviction in the public mind that greater energy of government is essential to the welfare and prosperity of the community.


Quote 201 details Share on Google+ - Quote 201 Linked In Share Button - Quote 201 The proposed Constitution, so far from implying an abolition of the State governments, makes them constituent parts of the national sovereignty, by allowing them a direct representation in the Senate, and leaves in their possession certain exclusive and very important portions of sovereign power. This fully corresponds, in every rational import of the terms, with the idea of a federal government.


Quote 206 details Share on Google+ - Quote 206 Linked In Share Button - Quote 206 The rights of neutrality will only be respected when they are defended by an adequate power. A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral.


Quote 153 details Share on Google+ - Quote 153 Linked In Share Button - Quote 153 Industry is increased, commodities are multiplied, agriculture and manufacturers flourish: and herein consists the true wealth and prosperity of a state.

Alexander Hamilton: Report on a National Bank, December 13, 1790

Quote 189 details Share on Google+ - Quote 189 Linked In Share Button - Quote 189 The fabric of American empire ought to rest on the solid basis of THE CONSENT OF THE PEOPLE. The streams of national power ought to flow from that pure, original fountain of all legitimate authority.

Alexander Hamilton: Federalist No. 22, December 14, 1787
The Federalist Papers

Quote 218 details Share on Google+ - Quote 218 Linked In Share Button - Quote 218 This balance between the National and State governments ought to be dwelt on with peculiar attention, as it is of the utmost importance. It forms a double security to the people. If one encroaches on their rights they will find a powerful protection in the other. Indeed, they will both be prevented from overpassing their constitutional limits by a certain rivalship, which will ever subsist between them.

Alexander Hamilton: speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 17, 1788


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