Founding Father Quotes

Patrick Henry

Patrick Henry

United States Founding Father
(1736 - 1799)

served as the first and sixth post-colonial Governor of Virginia from 1776 to 1779 and subsequently, from 1784 to 1786. A prominent figure in the American Revolution, Henry is known and remembered for his "Give me Liberty, or give me Death!" speech, and as one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Along with Samuel Adams and Thomas Paine, he is remembered as one of the most influential, radical[2] advocates of the American Revolution and republicanism, especially in his denunciations of corruption in government officials and his defense of historic rights. After the Revolution, Henry was a leader of the anti-federalists who opposed the replacement of the Articles of Confederation with the United States Constitution, fearing that it endangered many of the individual freedoms that had been achieved in the war.


Religion: Catholic

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Quotes by Patrick Henry


It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace-- but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

-= Unknown =-

This book is worth all the books that ever were printed, and it has been my misfortune that I never found time to read it with the proper attention and feeling till lately. I trust in the mercy of heaven that it is not too late.

-= Unknown =-

Amongst other strange things said of me, I hear it is said by the deists that I am one of the number; and indeed, that some good people think I am no Christian. This thought gives me much more pain than the appellation of Tory; because I think religion of infinitely higher importance than politics; and I find much cause to reproach myself that I have lived so long, and have given no decided and public proofs of my being a Christian. But, indeed, my dear child, this is a character which I prize far above all this world has, or can boast.

-= Unknown =-

Doctor, I wish you to observe how real and beneficial the religion of Christ is to a man about to die....I am, however, much consoled by reflecting that the religion of Christ has, from its first appearance in the world, been attacked in vain by all the wits, philosophers, and wise ones, aided by every power of man, and its triumphs have been complete.

-= Unknown =-

This is all the inheritance I give to my dear family. The religion of Christ will give them one which will make them rich indeed.

-= November 20, 1798, in his Last Will and Testament =-

The liberties of a people never were, nor ever will be, secure, when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them.

-= Virginia Ratifying Convention, June 9, 1788 =-

Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect everyone who approaches that jewel.Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect everyone who approaches that jewel.

-= Unknown =-

Are we at last brought to such humiliating and debasing degradation, that we cannot be trusted with arms for our defense?

-= Unknown =-

I have now disposed of all my property to my family. There is one thing more I wish I could give them, and that is the Christian Religion. If they had that and I had not given them one shilling they would have been rich; and if they had not that and I had given them all the world, they would be poor.

-= Unknown =-

The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people, it is a instrument for the people to restrain the government...

-= Unknown =-


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