James Madison - (1751 - 1836)

James Madison Signature
  1. Biography
  2. Picture
  3. Quotes
  4. Works
  5. Discussion

James Madison Tivia

James Madison served as the Fourth President of the United States
James Madison was called the "Father of The Constitution"
James Madison proposed the first twelve amendments to the Constitution
James Madison had two vice presidents die wile serving under him as president
... View all Founding Father Trivia.


James Madison Biography




Within site of Blue Ridge, in Virginia, lived three Presidents of the United States, whose public career commenced in the Revolutionary times, and whose political faith was the same throughout a long series of years. These were Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, and James Madison. The latter was born at the house of his maternal grandmother, on the banks of the Rappahannock, in Virginia, on the 16th of March, 1751. His parents resided in Orange county, and there, during a long life, the eminent statesman lived. After completing his preparatory studies, he was sent to the college at Princeton, Now Jersey, then under the charge of Dr. Witherspoon, for his parents knew the atmosphere of the lower country at Williamsburg to be uncongenial for personas from the mountain regions. He left Princeton, in the Spring of 1773, with health much impaired by intense study1 and immediately entered upon a course of reading preparatory for the practice of the law, which he had chosen for a profession. Political affairs attracted his attention, and he was diverted from law to public employments. In the Spring of 1776, he was a member of the convention which formed the first Constitution for the new free State of Virginia; and the same year he was elected a member of the State legislature. He lost the suffrages of his constituents the following year, because, it was alleged, he would not "treat" the people to Liquor, and could not make a speech! The legislature named him a member if the executive council, in which office he served until 1779, when he was elected to membership in the Continental Congress. He tools his seat there in March, 1780, and for three years he was one of the most reliable men in that body. 2

Mr. Madison was again a member of the Virginia Assembly, from 1784 to 1786, where he was the champion on of every wise and liberal policy, especially is religious matters. He advocated the separation of Kentucky from Virginia; opposed the introduction of paper money; supported the laws codified by Jefferson, Wythe, and Pendleton; and was the author of the resolution which led to the convention at Annapolis, in 1786, and the more important constitutional convention, in 1787. He was a member of the convention that formed the Federal Constitution, and lie kept a faithful record of all the proceedings of that body, day after day. 3 After the labors of the convention were over, he joined with Hamilton and Jay in the publication of a series of essays in support of it.4 These, in collected form, are known as The Federalist. In the Virginia convention called to consider the constitution, Mr. Madison was chiefly instrumental in procuring its ratification, in spite of the fears of many, and the eloquence of Patrick Henry. He was one of the first representatives of Virginia in the Federal Congress, and occupied a seat there until 1797. He was opposed to the financial policy of Hamilton, and to some of the most important measures of Washington's administration, yet this difference of opinion did not produce a personal alienation of those patriots. 5 His republicanism was of the conservative stamp, yet Mr. Jefferson esteemed him so highly that he chose him for his Secretary of State, in 1801. That station he filled with rare ability during the whole eight years of Jefferson's administration, and then he was elected President of the United States. It was a period of great interest in the history of our Republic, for a serious quarrel was then pending between the governments of the United States and Great Britain. In the third year of his administration quarrel resulted in war, which continued from 1812 until 1815.

After serving eight years as chief magistrate of the Republic, Mr. Madison, In March, 1817, returned to his paternal estate of Montpelier, where he remained in retirement until his death, which occurred almost twenty years afterward. He never left his native county but once after returning from Washington, except to visit Charlottesville, occasionally, in the performance of his duties as visitor and rector of the University of Virginia. He made a journey to Richmond, in 1829, to attend a convention called to revise the Virginia Constitution. He had married an accomplished widow, in Philadelphia, in 1794, and with her, his books, friends, and in agricultural pursuits, he passed the evening of his days In great happiness. At length, at the age of eighty-five years, on a beautiful morning in June (28th), 1836, the venerable statesman went peacefully to his rest.

1. while at Princeton, he slept only three hours of the twenty-four, for months together.
2. He was the author of the able instructions ructions to Mr. Jay, when be went as minister to Spain: also of the Address of the States, at the end of the war, on the subject of the financial affairs of the confederacy.
3. His interesting papers were purchased by Congress, after his death, for the sum of thirty thousand dollars.
4. See sketches of Hamilton and Jay.
5. Mr. Madison was opposed to the Alien and Sedition laws, enacted at the be ginning of John Adams' administration ; and it became known, after his death, that he was the author of the famous Resolutions on that topic, adopted in the convention of Virginia, held in 1798.

Source: Lossing, Benson J. Eminent Americans:

More Information about James Madison

Religion: Episcopalian
James Madison on Wikipedia | Amazon | Google

Documents from our document library


Biography for James Madison (1751 - 1836)
Biography for James Madison
(File Size: 5.54K)

Anti-Federalist Papers 1787 - 1788
Anti-Federalist Papers is the collective name given to the scattered writings of those Americans who during the late 1780s to early 1790s opposed to or who raised doubts about the merits of a firmer and more energetic union as embodied in the 1787 United
(File Size: 801.78K)

The Bill of Rights 12-15-1791
The Bill of Rights is the collective name for the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution. Proposed to assuage the fears of Anti-Federalists who had opposed Constitutional ratification, these amendments guarantee a number of personal freedo
(File Size: 3.23K)

The Federalist Papers 1787 - 1788
The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay promoting the ratification of the United States Constitution. Seventy-seven were published serially in The Independent Journal and The
(File Size: 1.10M)

Detached Memoranda 13962
James Madison, Detached Memoranda - Amendment I (Religion)
(File Size: 1.77K)


Article/Blog Entries


Wise Quotes From our Founding Fathers

Does it seem as though we are relying more and more on past personalities and their comments to give us sage advice instead of developing our own morality and intellect? Who determines what is a wise quote, a funny quote or even any comment that should be immortalized by the ages?

Democracy or Republic?

Despite clear historical evidence showing that the United States was established as a republic and not a democracy, there is still confusion regarding the difference between these two very different systems of government.  Some confusion stems because the word “democracy” is used to describe both a "type" and a "form" of government.

"Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death" - But In Current Textbooks the Context of These Words is Deleted

While I didn't write or compile this mountain of support information, I would ask you offer a humble prayer of thanks for that man or woman who did. Now it my/our privilege to offer free~reprint rights to others who dare to share the truth. Respectifully ,Russ Miles



From The Digital Public Library of America

There are currenlty are 1490 items in the DLPA for James Madison, only 25 are displayed here.

  1. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  2. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  3. Date: [1941-61]
    Type: text
    A condensed version of this work published in 1970 under title: The fourth President.
    University of Michigan
  4. Date: 1912
    Type: text
    University of Michigan
  5. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  6. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  7. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  8. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  9. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  10. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  11. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  12. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  13. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  14. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  15. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  16. Date: 1911-1911
    Type: image
    National Portrait Gallery
  17. Date: c. 1801-1810
    Type: image
    National Portrait Gallery
  18. Date: completed after the 1809 date on medal
    Type: image
    President George Washington began the practice of presenting peace medals to Indian chiefs on such important occasions as the signing of a treaty or a visit to the capital. By the time of Madison’s presidency, the Indians considered the medals an essential part of negotiations. In May 1812, John Mason, head of the Office of Indian Trade, ordered new Madison medals after learning that several chiefs would be visiting Washington. He did not want to give them leftover hollow Jefferson medals, knowing they preferred the solid ones the British gave out. Mason engaged John Reich, assistant to the chief coiner at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia, to cut the dies and strike the medals. Finally, on December 17, 1814, twelve silver medals of three different sizes arrived in Washington. The largest, pictured here, was given to the most important Indian chiefs.
    National Portrait Gallery
  19. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  20. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  21. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  22. Date: 1880-1880
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  23. Date: 1783 - 1888
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  24. Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
  25. Date: 1877-1877
    Type: image
    Wallach Division: Print Collection. The New York Public Library
See all the items for "James Madison" at the Digital Public Library of America

Quotes by James Madison


The very definition of tyranny is when all powers are gathered under one place."
Unknown


I cannot undertake to lay my finger on that article of the Constitution which granted a right to Congress of expending, on objects of benevolence, the money of their constituents.
Unknown


A dependence on the people is, no doubt, the primary control on the government; but experience has taught mankind the necessity of auxiliary precautions.
Federalist No. 51, February 8, 1788


A just security to property is not afforded by that government, under which unequal taxes oppress one species of property and reward another species.
Essay on Property, March 29, 1792


A local spirit will infallibly prevail much more in the members of Congress than a national spirit will prevail in the legislatures of the particular States.
Federalist No. 46, January 29, 1788

A popular Government, without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy; or, perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance: And a people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.
letter to W.T. Barry, August 4, 1822


A republic, by which I mean a government in which the scheme of representation takes place, opens a different prospect and promises the cure for which we are seeking.
letter to William Hunter, March 11, 1790


A universal peace, it is to be feared, is in the catalogue of events, which will never exist but in the imaginations of visionary philosophers, or in the breasts of benevolent enthusiasts.
essay in the National Gazette, February 2, 1792

All men having power ought to be distrusted to a certain degree.
speech at the Constitutional Convention, July 11, 1787


Ambition must be made to counteract ambition. The interest of the man must be connected with the constitutional rights of the place. It may be a reflection on human nature that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of government. What is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature?
Federalist No. 51, February 8, 1788


America united with a handful of troops, or without a single soldier, exhibits a more forbidding posture to foreign ambition than America disunited, with a hundred thousand veterans ready for combat.
Federalist No. 14, November 30, 1787


Among the features peculiar to the political system of the United States, is the perfect equality of rights which it secures to every religious sect.
letter to Jacob de la Motta, August 1820


Among the numerous advantages promised by a well-constructed Union, none deserves to be more accurately developed than its tendency to break and control the violence of faction.
Federalist No. 10, November 23, 1787

An elective despotism was not the government we fought for; but one in which the powers of government should be so divided and balanced among the several bodies of magistracy as that no one could transcend their legal limits without being effectually checked and restrained by the others.
Federalist No. 58, 1788


An ELECTIVE DESPOTISM was not the government we fought for; but one which should not only be founded on free principles, but in which the powers of government should be so divided and balanced among several bodies of magistracy, as that no one could transcend their legal limits, without being effectually checked and restrained by the others.
Federalist No. 48, February 1, 1788


 Next 15 >>

Showing results 1 to 15 of 126



Discussion