Founding Father Quotes

Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine

United States Founding Father
(1737 - 1809)

Thomas Paine (January 29, 1737 June 8, 1809) was a British pamphleteer, revolutionary, radical, inventor, intellectual, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.[1] He lived and worked in Britain until age 37, when he emigrated to the British American colonies, in time to participate in the American Revolution. His principal contributions were the powerful, widely-read pamphlet Common Sense (1776), advocating colonial America's independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain, and The American Crisis (17761783), a pro-revolutionary pamphlet series.


Religion: Diest

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Quotes by Thomas Paine


This new world hath been the asylum for the persecuted lovers of civil and religious liberty from every part of Europe. Hither have they fled, not from the tender embraces of the mother, but from the cruelty of the monster; and it is so far true of England, that the same tyranny which drove the first emigrants from home, pursues their descendants still.

-= Common Sense, 1776 =-

Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom, must, like men, undergo the fatigues of supporting it.

-= The American Crisis, No. 4, September 11, 1777 =-

Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.

-= The American Crisis, No. 1, December 19, 1776 =-

We fight not to enslave, but to set a country free, and to make room upon the earth for honest men to live in.

-= The American Crisis, No. 4, September 11, 1777 =-

We have it in our power to begin the world over again.

-= Common Sense, 1776 =-

What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value.

-= The American Crisis, No. 1, December 19, 1776 =-

When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary.

-= Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776 =-

"The balance of power is the scale of peace. The same balance would be preserved were all the world not destitute of arms, for all would be alike; but since some will not, others dare not lay them aside ... Horrid mischief would ensue were one half the world deprived of the use of them ... the weak will become prey to the strong."

-= Thoughts on Defensive War =-

The preservation of a free Government requires not merely, that the metes and bounds which separate each department of power be invariably maintained; but more especially that neither of them be suffered to overleap the great Barrier which defends the rights of the people. The Rulers who are guilty of such an encroachment, exceed the commission from which they derive their authority, and are Tyrants. The People who submit to it are governed by laws made neither by themselves nor by an authority derived from them, and are slaves.

-= 1785 - Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments =-

He who dares not offend cannot be honest.

-= Unknown =-

These are the times that try men`s soul`s

-= Unknown =-

What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives everything its value.

-= Unknown =-

Laws that forbid the carrying of arms disarm only those who are neither inclined, nor determined to commit crimes. Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants. They serve rather to encourage than prevent homicides from an unarmed man, may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man.

-= Unknown =-

Rights are not gifts from one man to another, nor from one class of men to another. It is impossible to discover any origin of rights otherwise than in the origin of man; it consequently follows that rights appertain to man in right of his existence, and must therefore be equal to every man.

-= Unknown =-

Mingling religion with politics may be disavowed and reprobated by every inhabitant of America.

-= Common Sense, 1776 =-


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